© 2019 by CODE LOTUS LLP US  All rights reserved.

IINFORMATION BOARD

DALLAS

1/4

Demographics of Dallas

                               White          Black        Native American        Asian          Hispanic

Total Population  56.6%         23.2%            0.4%                         2.5%          38.5%

FACTS ABOUT DALLAS
  1. Dallas is the third-largest city in Texas and the ninth-largest in the United States. As of 2009, the population of Dallas was about 1.3 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
     

  2. Southwest of Downtown lies Oak Cliff, a hilly area that has undergone gentrification in recent years in neighborhoods such as the Bishop Arts District. Oak Cliff originated as a township founded in the mid-1800s and was annexed by the city of Dallas in 1903. Today, most of the area's northern residents are Hispanic. The ghost town of La Reunion once occupied the northern tip of Oak Cliff. South Oak Cliff was once a mixture of Black/African American, Hispanic, and Native American. Today, it is predominantly African American. 
     

  3. Paul Quinn College is a private, historically black college located in southeast Dallas. Originally located in Waco, Texas, it moved to Dallas in 1993 and is housed on the campus of the former Bishop College, another private, historically black college. 
     

  4. Dallas has a humid subtropical climate. Winters in Dallas are generally mild, with normal daytime highs ranging from 55 °F to 70 °F and normal nighttime lows falling in between 30 °F and 45 °F. A day with clear, sunny skies, a high of 63 °F, and a low of 36 °F would thus be a very typical one during the winter. Springtime weather can be quite volatile, but temperatures themselves are mild. The weather in Dallas is also generally pleasant from late September to early December and on many winter days, but unlike in the springtime, major storms rarely form in the area.
     

  5. The most notable event held in Dallas is the State Fair of Texas, which has been held annually at Fair Park since 1886. 

Radio Stations

KNON 89.3 FM Dallas, TX Variety
KLIF 93.3 FM Haltom City, TX Top-40 
KBFB 97.9 FM Dallas, TX Hip Hop 
K273BJ (KGGR) 102.5 FM Dallas, TX Gospel Music 
KKDA 104.5 FM Dallas, TX Hip Hop 
KRLD 105.3 FM Dallas, TX Sports 
KKDA 730 AM Grand Prairie, TX Urban Contemporary 
KTCK 1310 AM Dallas, TX Sports 

 

A Touch of History

Dallas’ black history became realized in the post-Civil War era. After the war many blacks moved west to the DFW area looking for work in the train yards of Dallas, Fort Worth, and Denton. Many others built small rural agricultural communities outside these cities. As the area began to grow with industry more and more blacks came looking for opportunities. By the 1950s Blacks had been “redlined” into certain sections of the city, mainly South Dallas and Parts of Oak Cliff. But after forced desegregation during the civil rights era most whites abandoned Oak Cliff and it became home to a large portion of Black Dallas.

ENTERTAINMENT

  1. After Life -  Category: Nightclubs - REVIEW: "Afterlife is not only a great place to party, it is a community" -  1819 W Northwest Highway, Dallas, Texas (972) 869-3200
     

  2. Beamers -  Category: Nightclub -   2443 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas, TX (214) 902-6490
     

  3. Brooklyn Jazz Cafe -  Category: Nightclub -   1701 S Lamar Street, Dallas, TX (214) 428-0025
     

  4. Club Cirque -  Category: Nightclub -   1930 Pacific Street, Dallas, TX (214) 953-0047
     

  5. Club Dada -  Category: Club/Music Venue -  Rock,Rap-Hip Hop   - 2720 Elm Street, Dallas, TX 75226 (214) 748-5105
     

  6. Club Flow -  Category: Nightclub -   10945 Composite Drive, Dallas, TX (214) 366-3569
     

  7. Club Hush -  Category: Nightclubs - Club Hush is a dance club that features cumbia, reggae, and hip-hop. -  2642 Main Street, Dallas, Texas (214) 742-3691
     

  8. Deep Ellum -  Category: Night Life - Dallas headquarters for live music, former hotbed of the blues and of African-American life and culture. -  Elm St. & Good Latimer, Dallas, Texas (214) 747-3337 
     

  9. Dick's Last Resort -  Category: Club/Music Venue -  Rock,Rap-Hip Hop   - 2211 North Lamar Street, Dallas, TX 75202 (214) 747-0001.
     

  10. Escapade 2009 -  Category: Club/Music Venue -  Rap/Hip Hop, Mexican   - 10707 Finnell Street, Dallas, TX 75220, (214) 654-0545
     

  11. Ghost Bar @ The W Hotel -  Category: Nightclub -   2440 Victory Park Lane, Dallas, TX (214) 720-9919
     

  12. Hibashi -  Category: Nightclubs - Audience:Classy & Suave -  13465 Inwood Rd #100, Dallas, Texas (214) 810-5483
     

  13. IQ After Hours (Club Iniquity) -  Category: Nightclubs - For The Mature & Classy Only! Spinning Hip Hop, R&B, Old School, & Reggae! -  10821 Composite Dr, Dallas, Texas (972) 323-1100
     

  14. Kinki Lounge -  Category: Nightclub -   3606 Greenville Avenue, Dallas, TX (214) 874-0400
     

  15. Le Cirque -  Category: Nightclubs -  1930 Pacific Avenue, Dallas, Texas (214) 953-0047 
     

  16. Lizard Lounge -  Category: Nightclubs -  2424 Swiss Ave, Dallas, Texas (214) 826-4769
     

  17. Lower Greenville -  Category: Night Life - Restaurants, bars, nightclubs and a lively café scene draw an avid set of regulars. -  Between Blackwell and Yale, Dallas, Texas (214) 368-6722 
     

  18. Memphis -  Category: Club/Music Venue -  Rap/Hip Hop, Mexican   - Quorum Plaza, 5000 Belt Line Road, Suite 500, Dallas, TX 75254 (972) 386-9517  
     

  19. Murphy's Place -  Category: Club/Music Venue -  Blues, Jazz, R&B   - 9410 Walnut Street, Dallas, TX 75243 (214) 570-8175 
     

  20. O'Riley's -  Category: Club/Music Venue -  R&B, Rock   - 8989 Forest Lane, Suite 120, Dallas, TX 75243 (972) 235-2781 
     

  21. Prophet Bar -  Category: Nightclub -   2548 Elm Street, Dallas, TX (214) 742-3667  
     

  22. Pure Night Club -  Category: Club/Music Venue -  One of the most popular places for African Americans on Saturday nights in Dallas   - 2026 Commerce St. Dallas, TX 75201 (214) 742-7822 
     

  23. Silky Soul Swing-Out -  Category: Dance Instruction   - We are a premiere dance instruction and dance entertainment Bus. We promote health fun a fitness through Dance parties and vacation destinations   2023 Berwick Dallas, TX 
     

  24. Station 4 -  Category: Nightclubs -  3911 Cedar Springs, Dallas, Texas (214) 526-7171
     

  25. Sunset Lounge -  Category: Nightclubs - Be mesmerized by a good mix of Hip-Hop, R&B, and Caribbean grooves all evening long. -  3030 Ross Ave., Dallas, Texas (214) 909-5907
     

  26. TePheJez -  Category: Club/Music Venue -  African American dance club.   - 2226 Elm St. Dallas, TX 75201 (469) 916-3703 
     

  27. The Black Forest Theater -  Category: Club/Music Venue -  R&B, Rap-Hip Hop   - 1409 South Lamar, Suite 004, Dallas, TX 75215 (214) 421-0677
     

  28. The Vault Teen Club -  Category: Nightclub -   1313 Main Street, Dallas, TX  
     

  29. Trece -  Category: Nightclubs -  4513 Travis St., Dallas, Texas (469) 733-5181
     

  30. Velvet Room -  Category: Nightclub -   723 N. Pearl Street, Dallas, TX (214) 395-5540 
     

  31. Victory Tavern -  Category: Nightclub -  2501 Houston Street, Dallas, TX (214) 432-1900 
     

  32. Wish Ultra Lounge -  Category: Nightclub -   3001 Knox St Ste 210, Dallas, TX (214) 389-5723 
     

  33. Zouk -  Category: Nightclub -   703 McKinney Avenue, Dallas, TX (214) 295-4644

 

 

 

 

ANNUAL EVENTS

  1. Annual "Black Skirts and Shirts" Masquerade Party -   1444 Oaklawn Ave. - Suite 206  @ The Apartment - Dallas, Texas (214) 454-2481 

    Unparalleled Fall Flair at its Finest!! Unlimited Open Bar Provided All Night!! 

     

  2. Annual 4th of July Free Concert -   (July)

    All day. Showcase your talent. All types of music is welcome. Held at the Southwest Center Mall. 

     

  3. Dallas Black Expo -   Held in August at the Sterling Hotel 1055 Regal Row Dallas, Texas 75247 Free Parking .

    The Dallas Black Expo Team mission is for the expo is to cultivate prosperity among African American communities and businesses through education, empowerment, entrepreneurship and economic growth. 

     

  4. State Fair of Texas -   3921 Martin Luther King Blvd.   Dallas, Texas (214) 421-8737 

    Lots of rides, games, animals, corny dogs, music, and so on. 
     

CHURCHES

  1. Antioch Fellowship Baptist -   7550 South Hampton Road, Dallas, TX (972) 228-2420 
     

  2. Bethany Missionary Baptist Church -  6710 Webster St, Dallas, TX (214) 352-3552 - 
     

  3. Beth Eden Baptist Church -  1125 E Red Bird Ln, Dallas, TX (214) 374-7558
     

  4. Bethel AME Church -  Category: Black Churches -  1638 East Anne Arbor Ave, Dallas, Texas (214) 375-3567
     

  5. Carver Heights Baptist Church -  2510 E. Ledbetter Dr., Dallas, TX (214) 371-2024 - 
     

  6. Christian Chapel Cme Church Temple Of Faith -  14120 Noel Rd, Dallas, TX (972) 239-1975 
     

  7. Concord Church of Dallas   -   6808 Pastor Bailey Dr, Dallas, TX (214) 331-8522
     

  8. Concord Missionary Baptist Church -  Category: Black Churches -  6808 Boulder Drive, Dallas, Texas (214) 331-8522
     

  9. Cornerstone Community Fellowship Church -   17720 Dickerson Street, Dallas, TX (972) 294-0455
     

  10. Egypt Chapel Baptist Church -   1122 Hutchins Road, Dallas, TX (214) 942-0133 
     

  11. Elevate Church -  11611 Luna Drive, Dallas, TX (817) 794-0911 -
     

  12. Elizabeth Chapel CME Church -  Category: Black Churches -  East Tenth Street, Dallas, Texas (214) 375-6462
     

  13. Ewing Avenue Baptist Church -  1323 South Ewing, Dallas, TX (214) 942-4643 -
     

  14. Friendship West Baptist Church -  Category: Black Churches -  2020 W. Wheatland Rd, Dallas, Texas (972) 228-5200
     

  15. Hopewell Missionary Baptist Church   -   5144 Dolphin Road, Dallas, TX (214) 823-1018
     

  16. Israel United In Christ -   Come and learn the True Identity of the so-called black, Hispanic, & Native Americans according to the Bible.  2636 Walnut Hill Ln Suite 272 Dallas, TX 75229 (718) 303-9655  - (visit website) 
     

  17. Muhammad’s Mosque #48 -  Category: Black Churches -  2429 Martin Luther King Blvd, Dallas, Texas (214) 421-4848
     

  18. Munger Ave Baptist Church -  Category: Black Churches -  3919 Munger Ave at Lucille Ave, Dallas, Texas (214) 887-6509
     

  19. New Hope Baptist Church -  Category: Black Churches -  5002 South Central Expressway, Dallas, Texas (214) 421-5296
     

  20. New Mount Zion Baptist Church -   9550 Shepherd Road, Dallas, TX (214) 341-6459
     

  21. North Park CME Church -   6725 Tyree Street, Dallas, TX (214) 351-4276
     

  22. Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship -  Category: Black Churches -  1808 West Camp Wisdom Road, Dallas, Texas (214) 672-9100
     

  23. Pilgrim Rest Missionary Baptist Church   -   1819 N. Washington Avenue, Dallas, TX (214) 823-7308
     

  24. Pleasant Zion Missionary Baptist Church -   Black/African American Church located in Pleasant Grove  1910 N. St. Augustine Rd. 75217, Dallas, TX (972) 285-6359  -  
     

  25. Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church -   1114 Comal Street, Dallas, TX (214) 545-8779
     

  26. St. John Missionary Baptist Church -   2600 South Marsalis, Dallas, TX (214)375-4876
     

  27. St. Luke Community United Methodist Church -  Category: Black Churches -  710 East R.L. Thornton Freeway, Dallas, Texas (214) 821-2970
     

  28. St. Paul United Methodist Church -  Category: Black Churches -  1816 Routh Street, Dallas, Texas (214) 922-0000
     

  29. Temple Of Prayer Christian Fellowship -   1508 Cadiz St., Dallas, TX (214) 747-2797
     

  30. Warren Chapel A.M.E. -  Category: Black Churches-  3200 Navarro Street, Dallas, Texas (214) 742-8361

AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE

AFRICAN AMERICAN ARTS

1.Pan-African Connection Bookstore, Art Gallery and Resource Center

466 S Marsalis Ave Dallas, TX 75216 (214) 943-8262

2. African Imports Usa- South west center mall Dallas, TX 75237

(972) 296-9861.

3.Pan-African Connection 828 4th Ave Dallas, TX 75226 (214) 565-8466

AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM 

The African American Museum is an American Art museum located at 3536 Grand Avenue in Fair Park in Dallas, Texas. The museum was founded in 1974 and has operated independently since 1979.

 

Address: 3536 Grand Ave, Dallas, TX 75210

Phone: (516) 572-0730

Hours:10AM TO 5PM MON-FRI

Saturday           10AM–5PM

Monday            11AM–5PM

Tuesday            11AM–5PM

Wednesday      11AM–5PM

Thursday          11AM–5PM

Friday                11AM–5PM

Saturday           10AM–5PM

Sunday              Closed

 

The $7 million edifice was funded through private donations and a 1985 Dallas City bond election that provided $1.2 million for the construction of the new facility. The African American Museum is the only one of its kind in the Southwestern Region devoted to the preservation and display of African American artistic, cultural and historical materials. It has one of the largest African American Folk Art collections in the United States.

The main objective of the Museum is the presentation of meaningful experiences for children and adults who would not ordinarily visit a museum. The rich heritage of black art and history is housed in four vaulted galleries, augmented by a research library. Living African American culture is experienced through entertaining and educational programs presented in the theater, studio arts area and classrooms. The Museum's permanent collections include African art; African American fine art; magazine, historical, political and community archives.

The 38,000 square foot structure, built in the shape of a cross, is made of ivory stone. Natural materials and design motifs are used through the Museum in a manner reminiscent of pre-industrialized cultures of the African continent. The shape of the window represents an abstraction of the Dogon Statue from Mali, West Africa. This shape is also present in the entrance to a group of Ethiopian Orthodox churches that were excavated out of the surrounding rock at Lalibala in the 12th century.

 

Dallas Black History

 

Dallas’ black history became realized in the post-Civil War era. After the war many blacks moved west to the DFW area looking for work in the train yards of Dallas, Fort Worth, and Denton. Many others built small rural agricultural communities outside these cities. As the area began to grow with industry more and more blacks came looking for opportunities. By the 1950s Blacks had been “redlined” into certain sections of the city, mainly South Dallas and Parts of Oak Cliff. But after forced desegregation during the civil rights era most whites abandoned Oak Cliff and it became home to a large portion of Black Dallas.

Because of racism, drugs, crime, etc. These areas of the city fell into decline during the 60s, 70s, and 80s. However, as the Black middle class began to grow many of them built homes in areas such as Red Bird and started migrating to the southern and northern suburbs. Also black college grads and other migrants from across the country began flocking to Dallas in the late 80s and increasingly during the 90s. Declining areas of South Dallas and Oak Cliff are beginning to be revitalized through city and grass roots efforts. This brings us to where we are today; a growing and continually developing Black Dallas.

More than 30 black communities have been documented in early Dallas. 10th st and the Queen City neighborhoods in South Dallas have been preserved. Little Egypt gave way for a northeast Dallas development. Frogtown gave way to the West End Business district. The Prairie, once the core of black life near downtown fell prey to urban renewal. It is now a highway interchange. The following are some of the more known early black communities in the area.

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY DALLAS

Bear Creek (Irving)

The oldest known black community, founded by former slaves, in Dallas County is located in Irving. Jim Green, a former slave, bought land near Bear Creek in the 1850s. In the 1880s, Jim Green established a mission and helped build a one-room freedom school that later held as many as 80 students at a time. By 1900, nine black families owned land in Bear Creek. The Jackie Townsell Bear Creek Heritage Center at Bear Creek Heritage Park is part of the City of Irving’s Parks and Recreation. It is named after the city’s first black City counsel member and Bear Creek resident. Many of the areas original homes still stand but it is entirely surrounded by development.

Freedman’s Town /Tenth Street Historic District (Oak Cliff)

This district is the oldest relatively intact Freedmen’s Town in Dallas, with many of its original buildings still standing. A starter neighborhood for blacks soon after Emancipation, most of the remaining historic houses were built between 1890 and the early 1940’s in various folk designs: shotgun, double shotgun, and camel back. These modest houses are examples of the skill of black craftspeople; Roughly bounded by E. Clarendon, S. Fleming, IH-35E., E. 8th, eastern end of Church, E. 9th and Plum.

Freedman’s Town (North Dallas)
Freedman’s Town was created immediately after Emancipation as a separate settlement adjacent to the town of Dallas, but still well outside its limits so as to escape harsh vagrancy laws specifically targeting freedmen. By the close of Reconstruction, when it was incorporated into Dallas proper — Freedman’s Town contained at least 500 citizens. By the late 19th century, the area was known as the North Dallas Freedman’s Town. The name of the community has been changed. Originally known as Freedman’s Town, by the early twentieth century it was more commonly known to its own inhabitants as North Dallas and later still the “State-Thomas” Neighborhood incorporated into the city of Dallas at the close of Reconstruction in 1874.

Deep Ellum
The area was settled as a “freedmens’ town” by former slaves after the Civil War; its location on Elm Street, just east of the Houston and Texas Central tracks near the depot, was too far from downtown Dallas to be desirable. The area was called Deep Elm or, as early residents pronounced it, “Deep Ellum.” Because of the proximity of the railroad it was also called Central Track. Entertainment was an important part of the business of Deep Ellum, which became a Mecca for jazz and blues artists. In 1920 twelve nightclubs, cafes, and domino parlors were open in Deep Ellum, and by 1950 the number had grown to twenty. Many famous jazz and blues musicians played in the neighborhood at some time, including Blind Lemon Jefferson and Sam “Lightnin'” Hopkins.qqv Huddie “Leadbelly” Ledbetterqv began performing in 1920 in Deep Ellum, before he began his career in Greenwich Village in New York. By 1991 Deep Ellum had become popular as a nightspot for young urban dwellers and had fifty-seven bars and nightclubs. Today there are only a few clubs in Deep Ellum that cater to black clientele.

1/5

MUSIC CONCERTS